Monday Eats

Monday was a good day. Good food, good workout, good art class.

In the morning, I went to the gym for a treadmill workout. I did a 4-3-2-1 workout that went like this:

4-3-2-1 Treadmill Workout
time (mins)…speed
0-4…………….6.6
4-8…………….6.8
8-11…………..7.0
11-13…………7.2
13-14…………7.4
14-15…………6.6
repeat minutes 4-15 two more times
37-38……….6.6
38-39……….6.5
39-40……….6.4

This totaled 4.6 miles. It was definitely a challenging run, and could be made more difficult by increasing the speed or increasing the incline (I set it at 1%). Unfortunately, my leg was bothering me a little bit afterwards, so I will try to take it easy the next couple days.

Breakfast is unpictured, but it was exactly the same as the cottage cheese/trail mix/apple combo I had a few days ago. For lunch, I had the last of the yellow split pea and sweet potato soup with some salad on top (all you can see is the salad).

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In the afternoon I snacked on some banana mixed with cashew butter and cinnamon:

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After work, I went to half of a yoga class at my gym for some stretching, and then enjoyed a dinner of a cottage cheese biscuit, brussel sprouts, and lentil cakes. I smeared some raspberry jam on the biscuit and added a few almonds to the mix.

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This was the first meal I had with the biscuits and lentil cakes, and I would say everything came out really well! The biscuits were especially good – I could see having them for breakfast!

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Stir Fry – Is Gluten-Free Good?

I had dinner with a couple friends this past week. One of them has gone gluten free, so when we planned the menu, we decided on stir fry as an easy g-free option. Stirfry is fast, easy, delicious, and healthy – a perfect weeknight meal!

Add a little bit of oil to a wok, and add broccoli (and any other slower-cooking vegetables you are using):

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Sidenote: Check out that wok! I want to get something like this for my own kitchen. Whenever I make stirfry I just use a regular skillet, but this really seems superior – plenty of space for stirring and tossing.

Chop up the other vegetables and add to the pan:

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Once the vegetables have cooked for a few minutes, add in tofu (or other protein of choice), and stir to combine:

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Serve over rice, topped with soy sauce or other seasoning:

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And now a question about gluten…I’m assuming I’m not the only one who has recently had a slew of friends jump on the gluten-free train. I know a couple of people who have been diagnosed with celiac disease, but the majority of people I know who are keeping a gluten-free diet are doing so without having been given the diagnosis (in fact, most have been tested, come back negative, and still chosen to go g-free). Nonetheless, everyone I know who’s gone g-free (celiac or not) swears to feeling more energized, having better bowel functioning, and a greater sense of overall health.

Which brings me to the main question…is it really healthier?

In favor of gluten free, Dr. William Davis – the author of Wheat Belly, a bestselling diet book of 2012 – outlines a biological argument against wheat. In short, Davis says that the modern wheat we eat today has essentially ‘evolved’ through human plant breeding and modification. Our human bodies have not been able to adapt at a fast enough pace to match the changes in the food, so we are not really able to digest wheat (at least not modern-day wheat) properly. As a result, Davis argues, wheat leads to constipation, weight gain, and a whole range of other health issues. This applies to everyone – not just those with celiac – simply because we, as a species, are intolerant to the food.

*sidenote: Although the scientific side of his argument is compelling, Davis then goes on to suggest a diet that cuts out almost all carbs (even grains that are gluten free) as well as fruit for its high sugar content. This type of diet seems a bit extreme, not to mention that the dangers of a low-carb diet have been generally agreed upon by health professionals.

On the flip side, as someone with a history of an eating disorder, I see a lot of potential danger coming from removing entire categories of food from your diet when there is no true medical reason to do so. This seems an especially important consideration in the case of gluten given that most wheat and/or gluten-free plans, proponents, and books emphasize weight loss as one of g-free’s greatest benefits. The full title of Davis’ book, in fact, is Wheat Belly: Lose the Wheat, Lose the Weight, and Find Your Way Back to Health.

Overall, I would say that gluten-free is, obviously, a good idea for those who are suffering from celiac or a serious intolerance, but for others, this seems suspiciously like just another fad diet with potential physical and/or psychological dangers. What do you think? If you have an opinion on g-free, I’d love to see your thoughts in the comments section.

Go Bananas!!

I was surprised at all the banana comments I received after yesterday’s banana-related post. As a result, I started thinking about why bananas are so great.

Top 3 Reasons Bananas Rule
1.
they are CHEAP – definitely the most inexpensive fruit
2. they are versatile – sweet, savory, meal, snack, you get the idea
3. they are fun to eat

exhibit A

[source]

For all you other banana lovers out there, here are some suggestions for how to use this fabulous fruit:

Breakfast

Sandwiches/Wraps

  • pb (& j) with banana
  • pb & honey with banana (this is especially good grilled!

Snacks/Sweets

  • sliced banana with peanut butter and cinnamon
  • plain from the peel
  • soft serve banana ‘ice cream’
  • blended with ice and milk for a smoothie (optional add-ins: cocoa, peanut butter, blueberries, etc.)
  • eat frozen chunks for a snack in warm weather (warning: make sure you peel and cut the banana into small chunks BEFORE freezing!)
  • caramelized bananas

Moral of the story: EAT MORE BANANAS!!