Quick Trip to Montreal, part 2

If you missed the first Montreal post, check it out here! The first full day in Montreal was Monday, and we woke up bright and early to grab breakfast at the hotel and then set out for a full day of exploration. The hotel restaurant was very cute, and we snagged a table right by the window:

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Breakfast included coffee, juice, bread, fruit or yogurt, and a choice of eggs, omelette, crepes, or french toast. I got the vegetable omelette and Noah ordered crepes:

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After breakfast, we set out for a walking tour of Old Montreal. Noah was the guide, using the guide book borrowed from his parents. We visited the Montreal Bank (the oldest one in the city!):

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The red building on the left side of the picture below was Montreal’s first sky-scraper, called the Ediface New York Life:

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While its eight stories were a wonder at the time of its being built, it’s now been outdone by the Ediface Aldred on the right (resembling the Empire State Building – both of which were completed in 1931).

The tour also included Montreal’s Notre Dame:

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And City Hall:

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Unpictured tour stops include the Old Courthouse, some street markets (which were pretty deserted on the drizzly morning of our adventure), and a few more churches. Noah and I were excited to see a cycle track bike lane on one of the roads:

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We finished the tour by the Old Port on the waterfront. We could see Habitat 67 across the water, a distinctive housing project built for the 1967 World’s Fair in Montreal:

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It’s pretty far away in the photo above, so here are a couple other pics (not from me) that give you a better idea of its look:

800px-Habitat_67,_Montreal [source]download [source]

We also had a good view of some grain storage along the water:

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After a busy morning of exploration, Noah and I were excited to recharge with lunch. We headed to the Plateau Mont-Royal neighborhood for food and some additional exploration. Plateau Mont-Royal is an area full of shops, restaurants, and hints to the immigrant influences in Montreal. One such hint is an abundance of Jewish-style delis, restaurants, and smoked meats. Noah and I went to Beauty’s for lunch, a luncheonette opened in 1942 by Jewish immigrants in what was – at the time – the heart of Montreal’s Jewish garment district. 70 years later, Hymie (the restaurant founder in 1942) is still there, showing customers to their table himself! Noah and I had a wonderful lunch there before heading out for more exploration:

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In the afternoon, we explored Montreal’s Underground City – a system of tunnels that connects buildings across the city. In reality, it’s partially underground and partially above, but it’s a fun/useful way to help city residents escape the cold throughout the winter! Some parts of the tunnel system are fairly sparse:

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But in other areas the tunnels open up into shopping malls! We found this cool water fountain display in the middle of a mall area while we were exploring:

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Our day ended with a trip to a Montreal movie theater to watch the new Hunger Games movie (seriously, SO GOOD! Probably the best movie in the series) and a quick dinner of pizza and salmon:

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Montreal was the perfect vacation to celebrate the end of my semester and to spend some quality time with Noah before I headed to Israel for 2+ weeks. Speaking of…I am actually writing this from a Jerusalem cafe! It feels great to be back in Israel and this beloved city of gold. 🙂 More posts about Israel coming soon!

 

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Day trip to Rotterdam

After a great three days in Amsterdam, Noah and I wanted to take a day trip to another city in the Netherlands. Rotterdam was an easy day trip and offered some interesting sights related to architecture, so we thought this would be the perfect destination! Trains from Amsterdam to Rotterdam run frequently, so getting there from the Amsterdam Centraal Station wasn’t too much trouble. Unfortunately, the express train we had planned to take was cancelled (surprise surprise!), but the local train only took about 15 minutes longer, so it wasn’t too much of an inconvenience.

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Adventurin’…

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Rotterdam is known for its unusual and modern architecture. The city was basically entirely destroyed in World War II, so the entire landscape shows a very ‘new’ look, and it seems that the remodel opportunity was used to have some architectural fun. Architecture is an interest of Noah’s, so he was especially excited to see the city. We used an app (Rotterdam Info) to guide us on an architecture walk through the city.

The first stop…Rotterdam’s Centraal Station – this was easy since our train from Amsterdam arrived there!

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Rotterdam’s main train station, this building was revamped and reopened to the public in March 2014:

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Right near the train station were several other interesting buildings including Groot Handelsgebouw, an enormous business center that covers a building block of 720 x 275 ft. Also, this is the style that once symbolized post-war reconstruction in Rotterdam:

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Delftse Poort are high-rise office buildings just across the street from Centraal Station that immediately give the city a metropolitan feel. These buildings are an imposing 495 ft. tall and have a mirrored facade:

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De Calypso is a colorful building with sloping walls. Inside are apartments, offices, shops, and, naturally, parking:

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And, to make things even more fun, there’s an oddly shaped church attached to the end of De Calypso:

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The Westersingel canal (a primary canal in Rotterdam that runs from Chinatown to the Museum Quarter) has interesting sculptures dotting the pathway along the water. The name for this route is Beeldenroute Westersingel (Westersingel Sculpture Route). There are 17 sculptures featured, created by artists from around the world:

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The end of the sculpture walk brought us to an odd (and apparently somewhat controversial) statue. The statue’s official name is ‘Santa Claus.’ but it is known at the Buttplug Gnome (hence, the controversy as to whether this type of statue should be displayed by the city). It is supposed to be making a comment about pop culture.

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Moving right along…SHOPPING!!!

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Lijnbaan, the busiest shopping street in Rotterdam, was the first pedestrian shopping area in Europe. There was a large mix of stores including popular American brands I recognized as well as smaller boutiques:

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Just off of Lijnbaan is the City Hall building. There’s a street running under the center of the building!

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Interesting window shopping continued at the Beursplein, also sometimes called the ‘shopping trench’ because it is a below street-level pedestrian shopping area:

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Walking through the Beursplein led to a momentous occasion…my first Swatch! Noah is a big Swatch fan, and I finally let my envy of his cool watches get the better of me:

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The Grote of Sint Laurenskerk (often called Laurens Church) was built sometime in the late 15th or early 16th centuries and is the only surviving late-Gothic building in the city. Today, the building is used not only by tourists and churchgoers but also for concerts, lectures, and other large events:

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After all this sightseeing, Noah and I were hungry for lunch and excited to stop for a bite to eat at one of the most interesting buildings we saw…Markthal:

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Markthal (Market Hall) is a recently-opened indoor food market with shops, stands, produce vendors, restaurants and more. Of course, I would love this sort of food market no mater what, but the building itself is part of what makes this place really interesting. The building is built with apartments and offices forming a partial oval around an open-air center area. In this picture, the internal area extending from the large central window is the open-air market while the exterior ring is office buildings and apartments:

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Inside…food, food, food!

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From the inside, the ring of offices/apartments looms high above all the action, and the dividing wall is decorated with flower images:

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Here is a view to the outside from the center of the market:

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So neat!

After lunch, we looked at a couple of the other neat buildings in the immediate vicinity. Directly across the street from Markthal was Bibliotheek Rotterdam, Rotterdam’s public library:

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Also across from the Markthal are the iconic cube houses:

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These houses were designed by an architect named Piet Blom. His vision was to make the houses look like trees and have the complete unit appear like a forest.

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One cube house is a small museum of sorts where visitors can go inside and see what it would be like to live inside one of these houses. From the inside, the design seemed like a pretty inefficient use of space to me, but it was fun to get a view from within! Here’s a peek out of the attic window:

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Our last adventures of the day were to walk along the Nieuwe Maas (the large river running through Rotterdam) and to visit the Het Nieuwe Instituut.

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The wind next to the water was incredible. I literally thought I might be blown away, so we didn’t spend too long there before seeking cover on a different walkway. The Het Nieuwe Instituut is a contemporary museum about innovation. Unfortunately, our visit was a bit disappointing because half of the 4 exhibits were closed or not completed. There was a fairly detailed exhibit on 3D printing though….if that’s you’re thing. 🙂

Other posts from the Amsterdam Trip

Travel day and hotel
Van Gogh Museum, Rijksmuseum, and Keukenhof Gardens
Canal Cruise, Museum of the Canals, and the Old Jewish Quarter
Anne Frank House, Amsterdam City Museum, and Oude Kerk